Welcome Back Enota Readers!

September 23, 2012


Our mornings here in the North Georgia Mountains are getting brisk; autumn is in the air! And since now is the season to gather around the welcoming warmth of a cozy campfire, today’s topic is about campfire safety.

 

Some quick guidelines

–         Always check the weather conditions. Campfires are especially bad to have when conditions are far too dry (keeping a watch out for wet weather isn’t a bad idea either!).

–         Never build a campfire on a particularly windy day. Stray sparks or embers can travel far and create serious trouble.

–         Build your fire away from anything flammable (this includes overhanging tree branches or dry grass).

–         If at all possible, build your campfire in a fire pit.

–         NEVER use gasoline to “help” your fire along.

–         When using lighting fluid, be cautious and do not pour directly onto an open flame

–         Keep the environment clean; don’t burn garbage!

–         Don’t leave your campfire unattended.

–         Keep water and/or a shovel close by to douse the fire.

–         When putting out your fire with water, stir the embers and apply more water.

–         When using dirt or sand to put out a fire, use water. Still-burning coals still retain a good portion of their heat when buried.

 

Firewood Safety

Believe it or not, there are guidelines for firewood! Of course, these guidelines can vary from state to state, so you might want to brush up on some of these rules before going camping. The following guidelines, however, regard Georgia and the movement of wood across county or state lines.

 

Firstly, don’t move firewood! At least, be cautious about transporting it. Tree-killing insects, fungi, and diseases can hide in firewood. When the infected firewood travels, it takes those problems with it and even cause infestations in other areas. Even if you can’t see anything and the firewood seems fine, there could still be microscopic spores in the wood. And, because certain forest pests can occupy specific parts of the state, even moving wood a few miles or so can impact the new environment.

 

So what can you do? Well, you can use local firewood to start. However, if you’ve already brought your own firewood, the safest thing to do is burn ALL of it on-site before you leave. This helps to minimize potential distribution of pests. If you’re wondering how far you can transport your firewood, the answer is easy: don’t move firewood outside of the county it originated from.

For more information on Georgia firewood guidelines, please visit http://www.gatrees.org/ForestManagement/ForestHealth.cfm.

For information about your own state, you can visit your state’s Forestry Commission website.

 

And now for some campfire fun! We all know the campfire s’more classic: Hershey’s chocolate and marshmallow smashed between two graham crackers. But your campfire can help with so many other treats with just a bit of dedication.

 

Campfire Cherry Cobbler

Empty two 21-ounce cans of cherry pie filling into the bottom of a greased Dutch oven and cover with Bisquick shortcake batter. Put the lid on and place the pot directly onto the smoldering coals of the campfire, avoiding any intense flames. Cook for about thirty minutes, rotating every few minutes.

 

Banana Boat

Slice an unpeeled banana lengthwise without cutting all the way through the bottom peel. Pull it open and fill with marshmallows, chocolate, butterscotch, or chocolate chips, caramel, peanut butter, etc. Press the filling into the banana flesh and wrap it tightly in foil. Cook in the coals of the campfire away from the flames for about 10 minutes.

recipes obtained from chow.com

 

Enota Mountain Retreat

1000 Hwy 180,  Hiawassee GA 30546

(706) 896- 9966      email: enota@enota.com

official web site:  www.enota.com

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